Copyright Decision Map

The Copyright Decision Map utilizes concepts from UNB’s Copyright Policy and Fair Dealing Guidelines to navigate the rights and expectations when copying existing works. The Map is interactive. Begin by identifying the format of the work then select the publication type to reveal specific copyright information. The map includes examples of how to use and provide access to a variety of content.


What is the format of the work?

Use the license manager tool, select , to find the terms of use for our e-Book Collections. Keep in mind that license agreements vary across our collections. Learn more about using eBooks in the classroom

How will you use the work?

  • display a copy in a classroom presentation
  • share durable link via Desire2Learn
  • share durable link via Course Reserves
  • publish excerpts in a journal, book, or post on a website, blog, or social media > obtain permission from rights owner

Use the license manager tool, select , to find the terms of use for our e-Journals. Keep in mind that license agreements vary across our collections.

How will you use the work?

  • display a copy in a classroom presentation
  • share durable link via Desire2Learn
  • share durable link via Course Reserves
  • publish excerpts in a journal, book, or post on a website, blog, or social media > obtain permission from rights owner

Many publications available on the web are copyright-protected and require permission to share or distribute. Check the “terms of use” or “permissions” for all publications or contact copyright@unb.ca. Open Access publications offer users less access restrictions to copyrighted content. Check the “terms of use” or “permissions” for each resource. Also, there are many materials on the web under open licenses. For instance, Creative Commons Licenses are popular tools among creators that spell out the terms of use for their works. Check if a given work has a CC license.

Most images found on the web are copyright-protected and must be used in accordance with license terms, unless they explicitly indicate otherwise. Check the “terms of use” for all images. The Fine Arts Guide lists resources ideal for classroom use.

Here is also a guide for sourcing images with less copyright restrictions—images with open licenses or in the public domain.

Less copyright restrictions makes these images ideal for use outside of the classroom, such as your own publications and conference presentations.

How will you use the work?

  • display a copy in a classroom presentation
  • share link via Desire2Learn (UNB Libraries’ licensed resources or open licenses)
  • share link via Course Reserves (UNB Libraries’ licensed resources or open licenses)
  • publish excerpts in a journal, book, or post on a website, blog, or social media > check license or terms of use
  • adapt and change the work before sharing it > check license or terms of use

Audiovisual works sourced from the web for classroom use are subject to copyright protection similar to other electronic materials. Always check the “terms of use” or any copyright notices that accompany the work. Here are resources for locating films and music licensed for use by the UNB community and ideal for classroom use:

When using audiovisual works from your personal collection or personal subscriptions, you must ensure that you are using a lawfully made copy from a work that you have purchased and, in the case of streamed content, such as Netflix or Spotify, you are not infringing the terms of your user agreement. In contrast to institutional licenses, personal subscriptions typically prohibit public dissemination of content.

When playing films or music as part of a public screening or in a non-educational context, such as background music, you must obtain public performance rights.

How will you use the work?

  • play the work in the classroom (UNB Libraries’ licensed resources or personal copy)
  • share link via Desire2Learn (UNB Libraries’ licensed resources)
  • share link via Course Reserves (UNB Libraries’ licensed resources)
  • play the work as part of a public screening > obtain public performance rights
  • adapt and change the work before sharing it > check license or terms of use

The Map is intended to be a guide for commonly asked questions; it is important to remember that various factors must be considered when deciding how much and when you can copy others’ works. The Map should not be considered legal advice and you are encouraged to contact the UNB Libraries’ Copyright Office if the Map and associated webpages do not address your particular question.